IMPLANT CONTRACEPTIVES AND FAMILY PLANNING METHOD IN NIGERIA

IMPLANT CONTRACEPTIVES  

Description
Contraceptive implants are small rods ( almost like size of  match stick) that are inserted under the skin of a woman’s upper arm to release the hormone progestin slowly and prevent pregnancy.The latest implant to be registered in Nigeria is the two rod Sino-implant-II (Zarin).
 
Implant (like size of a match stick)
Implant ( insertion point )
Implant ( Insertion)






 

  Pictures

Direction of Picture in sequence

(a) physical size 

(b) Place of insertion 

(b) Insertion

Types Contraceptive Implants in Nigeria  


The  table below provides information about the implants that are in common use in Nigeria


Device
Design
Hormone
Duration of
effectiveness
Jadelle

 2 rods
  Levonorgestrel
   75 mg/rod


5 years
mplanon

 1 rods

Etonogestrel
68 mg/rod




3 years
Sino-implant [ZARIN]
75 mg/rod


2 rods

Levonorgestrel

4 years
(possibly 5)


Advantages and Benefi ts of Using Contraceptive Implants   

Contraceptive Benefits   

  • As a method of contraception, contraceptive implants are highly effective and safe
  • Contraception is immediate if inserted within the first seven days of menstrual cycle, or within the first five days for Implanon.
  • There is no delay in return to fertility.
  • They offer continuous, long-term protection

Non-contraceptive Health Benefits  

  • Implants do not affect breastfeeding.
  • They reduce menstrual fl ow.
  • They help prevent ectopic pregnancy (but do not eliminate the risk altogether).
  • They protect against iron-defi ciency anaemia.
  • They help protect from symptomatic PID.

Limitations and Side Effects of Contraceptive Implants

  • Contraceptive implants must be inserted and removed by trained providers.
  • Common side effects of using implants include menstrual changes, such as irregular light spotting or bleeding, prolonged bleeding, infrequent bleeding, and amenorrhea.
  • Non-menstrual side effects include headache, dizziness, nausea, breast tenderness, mood changes, weight change, and mild abdominal pain.
  • Contraceptive implants do not protect against STIs, including hepatitis B and HIV.

Women Who Can Use Contraceptive Implants without Restrictions

This method is acceptable with no restrictions for women of reproductive age, from menarche to menopause, with or without children, including the following:
  • Breastfeeding mothers after four weeks postpartum, or immediate postpartum if not breastfeeding
  • Women who prefer not to use or have contraindications to contraceptives that contain oestrogen or have developed oestrogen-related complications while taking COCs
  • Women with STIs and PID
  • Women with HIV and AIDS, unless they are on ARV therapy
  • Women with adequately controlled or moderate hypertension (BP is less than 160/100) and those with history of hypertension during pregnancy
  • Women who have had major and minor surgery without prolonged immobilisation, or varicose veins
  • Women who antibiotics, anitfungals or antiparasitics
  • Women with any of the following conditions– Valvular heart disease
– Sickle cell disease
– Non-migrainous headache or depressive disorders
– Endometriosis, severe dysmenorrhoea, benign ovarian tumours, fibroids
– Benign breast tumours, endometrial and ovarian cancer
– Goitre
– Viral hepatitis (acute/fl are, carrier, or chronic) or mild (compensated) cirrhosis

Women Who Can Use Contraceptive Implants with Extra Precautions 

Clinicians may provide contraceptive implants to women with the conditions listed below  and thereafter arrange for any necessary follow-up, evaluation and referral, as appropriate
  • Irregular, prolonged or heavy bleeding patterns
  • Diabetes without or with vascular complications
  • Woman with multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g., more than 35 years of age, cigarette smoking, diabetes, and hypertension)
  • History of hypertension where BP cannot be measured
  • Severe hypertension (BP of 160/100 or higher); or with vasculopathy
  • Migraine with or without aura
  • Gall bladder disease, symptomatic or asymptomatic
  • Cervical cancer (risk of sterility)
  • Receiving treatment with certain ARVs, anticonvulsants, and anti-TB drugs that may reduce blood

Women Who Should Not Use Contraceptive Implants

Women who have breast cancer or women with a history of breast cancer 4

Instructions to Women After Insertion

Women are counceled to expect some soreness or bruising (or both), after anesthetic wears off. This is common and does not require treatment in addition to these instructions:

  • Implants must be removed by the due date
  • Keep removal area dry for four to fi ve days.
  • Remove the gauze bandage after one or two days, but leave the adhesive plaster in place for an additional five days.
  • Return to the clinic if swelling and pain develops after the removal of the adhesive plaster.

END OF IMPLANT CONTRACEPTIVE AND FAMILY PLANNING METHODS. DO YOU HAVE A QUESTION? PLEASE ASK HERE

2 comments:

  1. What hospitals in Nigeria (lagos, specifically) offer this service?

    ReplyDelete
  2. IS IMPLANT CONTRACEPTIVE EFFECTIVE AFTER D& C ?

    ReplyDelete

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